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Review: Stolen Songbird by Danielle L. Jensen

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“I wish I was not who I am. I wish I had met you in different circumstances, in a place far away from here, where there was no magic, politics and deception. Somewhere where things could be different between us. I wish I was someone else. But I am what and who I am, and all the wishes in the world will not change that.”

The narrator, a young village girl named Cécile, was taught ever since her childhood to sing as beautifully as her mother once did. Her teachers were brutal but efficient, and eventually she sang with such strength that her talents would soon land her outside of her rural hometown and into great fame and fortune. But on the eve of her birthday, as she rides home without a chaperone, she is kidnapped by a neighbor and taken beneath the mountains as tribute for the trolls who had been seeking her. A witch’s curse imprisoned the trolls so that they could never be above ground again, but with the arranged proposal between our heroine and the Prince Tristan of Trollus, many believed the curse would break and set them free. However, when the curse remains in place, Cécile is left with one thing on her mind: escape Trollus or be killed alongside her betrothed.

I truly wanted to enjoy this story, especially because I know many who loved it, and the premise seemed wonderful, but sadly that is not what happened.

As I’ve mentioned, the heroine is kidnaped not too far into the story (first few chapters) and taken beneath the earth. This was my first uneasy sign of how the rest of the book would fall through, because while not every heroine comes written with blades and military training, this one didn’t have the strength of mind or willpower to at least try to flee from her captor. She must’ve fallen a dozen times in her attempted plight, and at one point she even concedes to just walk behind him because she knows she is screwed. About ten more chapters later she sees her captor bartering his wares in the goblin market, and instead of being outraged she is relieved and hopes to find comfort from him. I understand they’re the only humans in the realm, but really? He is the reason you’re there in the first place. Why try to ally with him? You can gather by now the pattern in which this character will continue.

Then we have the supposed love interest— Prince Tristan of Trollus. Coincidentally everyone else in the realm has some sort of deformity to show their troll status but Tristan looks human right down to the color of his eyes. He is arrogant and brooding, two traits I loath, and although the perspective shits with each chapter between him and Cécile, I still couldn’t understand where his sudden affection for her came from. One chapter they’re screaming at each other, and the next he is secretly in love with her. “But Alas! She cannot know for she will be endangered so I shall continue being a giant asshole to her.” Or something along those lines. And when she started to reciprocate the feelings I wanted to just stop reading then and there because the romance makes absolutely no sense and if anything felt a bit like a Stockholm Syndrome scenario. The only relationship throughout the entire novel that I did enjoy was between Cécile and Tristan’s cousin and closest friend, Marc. But that all changed when our heroine did something brash, got her love interest in vital danger, and was blamed for nearly killing the Prince in the only moment I was rooting for her— while she was trying to finally escape. Upon Tristan’s injured state, Marc is so enraged that he attempts to physically hit Cécile but cannot, not because he knows he damn well shouldn’t, but because of an oath he pledged never to harm her. So instead, he asks the nearest guard to do it for him. (What the literal fuck.) At least that guard has the sense not to, but don’t worry; she forgives Marc regardless.

And perhaps it was just me, but the way in which the trolls were described disturbed me a bit. For me, it was a little too many digs at deformities (yes, even for a fantasy series about trolls) and I was uncomfortable by how many times disfigured people were referenced as monsters and disgusting creatures. I know the author must not have wanted it to come off that way, but personally I felt that it did and I would rather their descriptors had been written differently.

Where the plot is concerned, I felt that too was another flop of a concept that had a wonderful premise and build up. It was very vague and a lot of the scenes I found were mundane, and every once in a while I had to force myself not to skim over a whole section because it either didn’t make sense or had no relevance to the immediate plot. That could also just be a reflection on the writing style as well. I wasn’t much of a fan of either.
I would not recommend this book although I understand that many people felt differently about it, so perhaps you will as well. I won’t be reading the rest of this series because I don’t have high hopes but I do have a million books on my TBR pile that I’d like to get to instead. Hopefully my next read will be better!

My Rating: 1/5 
Goodreads Link: X

book reviews · reviews

Review: An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

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This book is a spring banquet of ripe grapefruit wine, a summer morning beneath swaying willow trees, an autumnal bonfire deep in the woods, and a wintry dusk backset to the wind.

….At least it made me feel that way. Rogerson killed the imagery game.

I’ve been waiting for a very long time for a book like this to come out. I’ve always been obsessed with faeries and elvish folklore, and while I’ve read just about every book related to those mythologies nothing ever seemed quite right. Sure, all of the characters had pointy ears, magical powers, and lived somewhat near the forest, but that’s about where the similarities cut off. I wanted a story where the Fae were humanoid with tree roots for limbs and flowers for lips, where they worshipped nature instead of just lived in it— something closer to the rendition of Celtic folklore including the Wild Hunt, changelings, and caverns beneath the earth. And I’m so happy to say that An Enchantment of Ravens was that book for me.

Our narrator is a young portrait artist named Isobel who lives in a village called Whimsy where it is eternally summer. Her Craft— a form of human creativity that cannot be done by Fair Folk without risk of harm—is legendary for someone her age, and various Fair Ones come to visit her parlor to be painted, if only for a small price. All masters of Craft receive enchantments as a form of payment, but if worded wrong these wishes can go awry. Isobel always wishes for practical things and words them right, much to the delight of her regular client and wish-granter Gadfly. But upon one of his usual visits, Gadfly tells Isobel that she should expect the Autumn Prince soon. And while she gets to know Rook more intimately than any of her other clients, she accidentally paints mortal sorrow into his eyes. For this, the price is grave, and now Rook must take Isobel to his home, the Autumnlands, to stand trial for what she has done. However, they might never make it there with what lurks between her world and his kingdom.

The writing, the plot, the characters, the romance….everything in this book is a treat. At first I thought that it might be a bit fast-paced because it’s just a tad smaller in length to some of my more recent reads, but that’s definitely not the case. It was well thought out from the start to the finish with no “filler” scenes or rushed pivotal moments. I took my time reading this book and it really helped me delve into the setting so much so that I felt a deep connection with the main characters by the commencement of the final page.

As I’ve mentioned before, one of the deal-breaking moments for me was the rendition of the Fae. The Fair Folk in this book cannot lie, are harmed by iron, have humanoid skins they wear as a disguise to hide their more monstrous forms underneath, live in places made of all things natural, and (my favorite) don’t have emotions. Supposedly.

One thing that always stood out to me amongst these other faerie novels was that the authors were quick to include emotion of some sort amongst their kind, wherein the original tales depicted the Fae as cruel, often vindictive and evil characters that didn’t feel human emotion and rather loved to toil with it for their own reprieve. That being said, the only romance featured in this book is saved for the main characters—which I thought was a wonderful decision as opposed to the usual minor “ships” that are often sidelined and then forced to fulfill plot devices. Also, it made the story seem more like a fairytale which was entirely the vibe I got from it (a morbid, eerily beautiful fairytale at that).

“He was no more able to understand the sorrow of a human’s death than a fox might mourn the killing of a mouse.”

Not to be dramatic, but I think I’ve found my favorite YA male protagonist as well. I had gone into this book believing that the Autumn Prince would be brooding with a side of dark humor (you know the type, I’m sure) but you can imagine my utter surprise when I find that Rook is, in fact, quite the opposite. He is good-natured, apologizes whenever he thinks he’s upset someone even when he hasn’t, doesn’t understand human emotion and finds it terrifying, and has a deep love for autumn. There were many hysterical moments between Rook and Isobel but I won’t mention them here because they’re something you should experience on your own. However, I will say that when someone bows or curtsies to a Fair One, that Fae must return the gesture immediately.

His character development is prominent throughout the story, as is Isobel’s, but I won’t mention more for fear of spoiling you. Rest assured, there were many things I picked up on that had changed from the beginning to the end, and they changed for the better. I also adore the way in which his physical descriptor was written: “…against his golden-brown complexion, which put me in mind of late-afternoon sunlight dappling fallen leaves.” And I think it’s important to note that he has ADHD, something my brother suffers from, and I found it refreshing to see this trait with a main character for a change. Did I mention that he can also transform into a dark horse and a raven?

I’ve already re-read this story three times and each time brings about stronger emotions for me. This is one of those books that you’ll want to revisit frequently because it plays with your heart in ways no other stories have (at least that’s the case for me)! The ending was wild, and while everything was answered and little to no ties were left untangled, I still want more. As of now I believe this is a stand-alone, but if there were ever a sequel in it’s future there would be plenty of things to write further more from where this book ended. If not that, then you can expect I’ll be dabbling in my fair share of Fanfiction. Enough said: READ THIS BOOK.

My Rating: 5/5
Goodreads Link: X

And because I’m so enraptured with this tale, I did a little makeup look inspired by the Autumnlands! It’s nothing overly magnificent because I just recently discovered my love for makeup, but it’s certainly something else. Who knows, I’d still wear this to class.

Eyeshadow: Modern Renaissance by Anastasia Beverly Hills
Liquid Eyeliner: Kat Von D
Elf Ears: Geekling Creations on Etsy

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recommendations · Uncategorized

Faerie Book Recommendations

Faeries, elves, dwarves, and druids are only a few of my favorite fictional creatures. I’m constantly searching for fantasy series that incorporate these characters, and although the fairy/faerie trope has recently skyrocketed thanks to authors like Cassandra Clare and Sarah J. Maas, I feel as though those are only certain types of Fae, being portrayed in drastically different manners with different parts of folkloric inspiration. And while I once enjoyed both the Seelie characters in Clare’s books, and all of the Fae in Mass’s stories, I’ve grown tired of the same few representations of these mythical beings. (This applies to almost every YA faerie book I’ve read— but needless to say there are many books that I find could replace the word “fairy” with “vampire” or “witch” and the readers wouldn’t notice the difference so long as said characters are still dark, sexy, and magical. I suppose the pointy ears are the only real giveaway.)

I’m not writing this post with the intent to bash popular authors. However, if you’re looking to move on or recover from a series and want books similar to it that are perhaps even better than the original… look no further. I’ve loved the Fae since I was a little girl, and the fact that there are so few known books about them makes me sad. That being said, here’s a list of all the faerie books I’ve read or will be reading this year! Beware the fair ones, friends.

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

aeor coverIsobel is a prodigy portrait artist with a dangerous set of clients: the sinister fair folk, immortal creatures who cannot bake bread, weave cloth, or put a pen to paper without crumbling to dust. They crave human Craft with a terrible thirst, and Isobel’s paintings are highly prized among them. But when she receives her first royal patron—Rook, the autumn prince—she makes a terrible mistake. She paints mortal sorrow in his eyes – a weakness that could cost him his life.

Furious and devastated, Rook spirits her away to the autumnlands to stand trial for her crime. Waylaid by the Wild Hunt’s ghostly hounds, the tainted influence of the Alder King, and hideous monsters risen from barrow mounds, Isobel and Rook depend on one another for survival. Their alliance blossoms into trust, then love, violating the fair folks’ ruthless Good Law. There’s only one way to save both their lives, Isobel must drink from the Green Well, whose water will transform her into a fair one—at the cost of her Craft, for immortality is as stagnant as it is timeless.

Isobel has a choice: she can sacrifice her art for a future, or arm herself with paint and canvas against the ancient power of the fairy courts. Because secretly, her Craft represents a threat the fair folk have never faced in all the millennia of their unchanging lives: for the first time, her portraits have the power to make them feel.

The Dreaming Tree by C.J. Cherryh

It was that transitional time of the world, when man first brought the clang of iron and the reek of smoke to the lands which before had echoed only with fairy voices. In that dawn of man and death of magic there yet remained one last untouched place—the small forest of Ealdwood—which kept the magic intact, and protected the old ways. And there was one who dwelt there, Arafel the Sidhe, who had more pride and love of the world as it used to be than any of her kind. But fear of the world of Faery ran deep in the hearts of men, and when Ciaran Cuilean, Lord of Caer Wiell, a man with Elvish blood in his veins, found himself the object of increasing distrust and suspicion from his men, his king, and even his own family, he knew he must once again put his humanity aside and return to Ealdwood. For shadows of a newly awakened evil swarmed across both lands, and unless Ciaran reclaimed his haunted weapons from the Tree of Swords and joined Arafel, he would see this evil overtake not only the warm hearthstones of the mortal keeps but the silvery heart of Ealdwood itself!

Under the Pendulum Sun by Jeannette Ng

pendelum sun coverCatherine Helstone’s brother, Laon, has disappeared in Arcadia, legendary land of the magical fae. Desperate for news of him, she makes the perilous journey, but once there, she finds herself alone and isolated in the sinister house of Gethsemane. At last there comes news: her beloved brother is riding to be reunited with her soon – but the Queen of the Fae and her insane court are hard on his heels.

Rhapsodic by Laura Thalassa

Callypso Lillis is a siren with a very big problem, one that stretches up her arm and far into her past. For the last seven years she’s been collecting a bracelet of black beads up her wrist, magical IOUs for favors she’s received. Only death or repayment will fulfill the obligations. Only then will the beads disappear.

Everyone knows that if you need a favor, you go to the Bargainer to make it happen. He’s a man who can get you anything you want… at a price. And everyone knows that sooner or later he always collects.

But for one of his clients, he’s never asked for repayment. Not until now. When Callie finds the fae king of the night in her room, a grin on his lips and a twinkle in his eye, she knows things are about to change. At first it’s just a chaste kiss—a single bead’s worth—and a promise for more.

For the Bargainer, it’s more than just a matter of rekindling an old romance. Something is happening in the Otherworld. Fae warriors are going missing one by one. Only the women are returned, each in a glass casket, a child clutched to their breast. And then there are the whispers among the slaves, whispers of an evil that’s been awoken.

If the Bargainer has any hope to save his people, he’ll need the help of the siren he spurned long ago. Only, his foe has a taste for exotic creatures, and Callie just happens to be one.

Wildwood Dancing by Juliet Marlier

High in the Transylvanian woods, at the castle Piscul Draculi, live five daughters and their doting father. It’s an idyllic life for Jena, the second eldest, who spends her time exploring the mysterious forest with her constant companion, a most unusual frog. But best by far is the castle’s hidden portal, known only to the sisters. Every Full Moon, they alone can pass through it into the enchanted world of the Other Kingdom. There they dance through the night with the fey creatures of this magical realm.

But their peace is shattered when Father falls ill and must go to the southern parts to recover, for that is when cousin Cezar arrives. Though he’s there to help the girls survive the brutal winter, Jena suspects he has darker motives in store. Meanwhile, Jena’s sister has fallen in love with a dangerous creature of the Other Kingdom–an impossible union it’s up to Jena to stop.

wildwood dancingWhen Cezar’s grip of power begins to tighten, at stake is everything Jena loves: her home, her family, and the Other Kingdom she has come to cherish. To save her world, Jena will be tested in ways she can’t imagine–tests of trust, strength, and true love.

Spindle Fire Lexa Hillyer

A kingdom burns. A princess sleeps. This is no fairy tale.

It all started with the burning of the spindles.

No.

It all started with a curse…

Half sisters Isabelle and Aurora are polar opposites: Isabelle is the king’s headstrong illegitimate daughter, whose sight was tithed by faeries; Aurora, beautiful and sheltered, was tithed her sense of touch and her voice on the same day. Despite their differences, the sisters have always been extremely close.

And then everything changes, with a single drop of Aurora’s blood—and a sleep so deep it cannot be broken.

As the faerie queen and her army of Vultures prepare to march, Isabelle must race to find a prince who can awaken her sister with the kiss of true love and seal their two kingdoms in an alliance against the queen.

Isabelle crosses land and sea; unearthly, thorny vines rise up the palace walls; and whispers of revolt travel in the ashes on the wind. The kingdom falls to ruin under layers of snow. Meanwhile, Aurora wakes up in a strange and enchanted world, where a mysterious hunter may be the secret to her escape…or the reason for her to stay.

Stardust by Neil Gaiman

Young Tristran Thorn will do anything to win the cold heart of beautiful Victoria—even fetch her the star they watch fall from the night sky. But to do so, he must enter the unexplored lands on the other side of the ancient wall that gives their tiny village its name. Beyond that old stone wall, Tristran learns, lies Faerie—where nothing, not even a fallen star, is what he imagined.

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Neil Gaiman comes a remarkable quest into the dark and miraculous—in pursuit of love and the utterly impossible.

Blackbringer by Laini Taylor

When the ancient evil of the Blackbringer rises to unmake the world, only one determined faerie stands in its way. However, Magpie Windwitch, granddaughter of the West Wind, is not like other faeries. While her kind live in seclusion deep in the forests of Dreamdark, she’s devoted her life to tracking down and recapturing devils escaped from their ancient bottles, just as her hero, the legendary Bellatrix, did 25,000 years ago. With her faithful gang of crows, she travels the world fighting where others would choose to flee. But when a devil escapes from a bottle sealed by the ancient Djinn King himself, the creator of the world, she may be in over her head. How can a single faerie, even with the help of her friends, hope to defeat the impenetrable darkness of the Blackbringer?

At a time when fantasy readers have an embarrassment of riches in choosing new worlds to fall in love with, this first novel by a fresh, original voice is sure to stand out.

Under the Green Hill by Laura L. Sullivan

Meg and her siblings have been sent to the English countryside for the summer to stay with elderly relatives. The children are looking forward to exploring the ancient mansion and perhaps discovering a musty old attic or two filled with treasure, but never in their wildest dreams did they expect to find themselves in the middle of a fairy war.

under the green hillWhen Rowan pledges to fight for the beautiful fairy queen, Meg is desperate to save her brother. But the Midsummer War is far more than a battle between mythic creatures: Everything that lives depends on it. How can Meg choose between family and the fate of the very land itself?

The Goblin Wood by Hilari Bell

It began with the chiming of the tiny copper bell on the mantel, warning them someone was passing the ward stone her mother had placed on the path to their house …

One terrible day, Makenna, a young hedgewitch, witnesses her mother’s murder at the hands of their own neighbors. Striken with grief and rage, Makenna flees the village that has been her home. In the wilds of the forest, she forms an unexpected alliance. Leading an army of clever goblins, Makenna skillfully attacks the humans, now their shared enemy.

What she doesn’t realize is that the ruling Hierarchy is determined to rid the land of all magical creatures, and they believe Makenna is their ultimate threat – so they have sent a young knight named Tobin into the Goblin Wood to entrap her.

In this captivating fantasy adventure, the difference between Bright and Dark magic is as deceptive as our memories, hopes, and fears — and the light of loyalty and friendship has a magic all of its own.

A young Hedgewitch, an idealistic knight, and an army of clever goblins fight against the ruling hierarchy that is trying to rid the land of all magical creatures.

Elfland by Freda Warrington

Rosie Fox is a daughter of the Aetherials, an ancient race from the Spiral—the innermost realm of the Otherworld—who lives secretly among us. Yet she and her kind are bereft of their origins, because on Earth, in a beautiful village named Cloudcroft, the Great Gates between worlds stand sealed.

elfland coverHer parents, Auberon and Jessica, are the warm heart of Cloudcroft and of Rosie’s loving family. But on the hill lives the mysterious, aloof Lawrence Wilder, Gatekeeper to the inner realms of Elfland. Tortured by private demons, he is beset by trouble on all sides: his wife has vanished and his sons Jon and Sam are bitter and damaged. Lawrence is duty bound to throw open the Gates every seven years for the Night of the Summer Stars, a ritual granting young Aetherials their heritage, their elders vital reconnection to their source. Lawrence, however, is haunted by fears of an ever-growing menace within the Spiral. When he stubbornly bars the Gates, he defies tradition and enrages the Aetherial community. What will become of them, deprived of the realm from which flows their essential life force? Is Lawrence protecting them—or betraying them?

Growing up amid this turmoil, Rosie and her brothers, along with Sam and Jon Wilder, are heedless of the peril lurking beyond the Gates. They know only that their elders have denied them their birthright, harboring dark secrets in a conspiracy of silence.

When Sam is imprisoned for an all-too-human crime, age-old wounds sunder the two families…yet Rosie is drawn into his web, even as she fears the passions awoken in her by the dangerous Wilder clan. Torn between duty and desire, between worlds, Rosie unwittingly precipitates a tragedy that compels her to journey into the Otherworld, where unknown terrors await. Accompanied by the one man most perilous to her life, she must learn hard lessons about life and love in order to understand her Aetherial nature…and her role in the terrifying conflict to come.

Midwinter by Matthew Sturges

Winter comes to the land only once in a hundred years. But the snow covers ancient secrets: secrets that could topple a kingdom.

Mauritaine was a war hero, a captain in the Seelie Army. Then he was accused of treason and sentenced to life without parole at Crere Sulace, a dark and ancient prison in the mountains, far from the City Emerald. But now the Seelie Queen – Regina Titania herself – has offered him one last chance to redeem himself, an opportunity to regain his freedom and his honor.

Unfortunately, it’s a suicide mission, which is why only Mauritaine and the few prisoners he trusts enough to accompany him, would even dare attempt it: Raieve, beautiful and harsh, an emissary from a foreign land caught in the wrong place at the wrong time; Perrin Alt, Lord Silverdun, a nobleman imprisoned as a result of political intrigues so Byzantine that not even he understands them; and Brian Satterly, a human physicist, apprehended searching for the human victims of the faery changeling trade.

Meanwhile, dark forces are at work at home and abroad. In the Seelie kingdom, the reluctant soldier Purane-Es burns with hatred for Mauritaine, and plots to steal the one thing that remains to him: his wife. Across the border, the black artist Hy Pezho courts the whim of Mab, offering a deadly weapon that could allow the Unseelie in their flying cities to crush Titania and her army once and for all.

With time running out, Mauritaine and his companions must cross the deadly Contested Lands filled with dire magical fallout from wars past. They will confront mounted patrols, brigands, and a traitor in their midst. And before they reach their destination, as the Unseelie Armies led by Queen Mab approach the border, Mauritaine must decide between his own freedom and the fate of the very land that has forsaken him.

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Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge

“They said that love was terrifying and tender, wild and sweet, and none of it made any sense. 

But now I knew that every mad word was true.”

After the release of the live action Beauty and the Beast film staring Emma Watson about a month ago, I’ve been searching for other retellings to satisfy my renewed interest in the classic. I’ve seen this book various times on social media— often being compared to one of those “if you liked this popular YA book, then you might enjoy this one” types of commentaries. So a year later, I decided to give Rosamund Hodge a try.

Cruel Beauty is set against a Greco-Roman background but instead of deriving from the eighth century BC, it is geared more towards the eighteenth century. Nyx, our narrator, has forever been engaged to marry the demon lord who rules over her village. A bargain had been struck from before she was even conceived, allotting that one daughter of the bargainer’s offspring must be given to the demon to be his betrothed when she is of age. And even though Nyx is a twin to a beautiful and charismatic sister, it had always been her that was chained to this dark destiny. We follow our heroine throughout this story as she navigates into her husband’s palace, searching for clues to unbind him from his curse and free her people from demonic enslavement.

I’ve heard many people rave about this book and even compare it to one of my favorite tales, A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J Maas, but unfortunately I didn’t experience the same thrill. I’m actually a bit disappointed, because while I enjoyed certain aspects there was plenty that I felt could have been further explained or revisited to make the plot seem stronger and the characters less vague.

For starters, we have our main protagonist Nyx. I love her name and thought it was fitting because Nyx in Greek mythology is the daughter of Chaos and the personification of night. She was interesting to read during the first section of the story before going to the palace. In that part, I found her inner conflict very relatable: is it right to hate someone for something they have no control over? Especially a family member? Nyx seemed like a character with grey morals and appropriate inquires for someone her age/ in her position… which is amazing considering I’ve read books on the contrary that drove me mad! But once she is finally placed in a different setting outside of her village, her character seemed to…deflate? (I can think of no better word, honestly.) Sure, she is more sarcastic and witty. But then again, so was Ignifex— her main love interest and the adaption of the “Beast.” I felt as though half of what I wound up reading was mindless banter between the two of them with no real plot or revelations. And not for nothing, but when I say that the characters started to blur with one another, I quite literally mean that. There is a character who may or may not be another character just wearing different flesh. So overall, the narrative was making me aggravated after a while.

The writing was nice, however it did lag on a bit during certain scenes. I realize that inner monologue is wonderful to have when faced with a complex character, but if I feel as though the questions being brought up by the protagonist were becoming overly frequent or obvious. Most of the acton throughout the book was spent searching for four elemental “keys” of a sort, but naturally we don’t get anywhere until the very last pages of the book. And even then I still had so many questions that were left completely unanswered. The magic system confused me, the love interests felt forced, and the plot twists didn’t entirely seem to make sense? I wondered if it was just me being too obtuse, but after going back to re-read some chapters I still find these problems unattended to.

While supposedly being a Beauty and the Beast retelling, we honestly could have gone without the romance and the book might have even been more pleasant to read. Yes, there is a love triangle of sorts. I won’t spoil much, but this particular triangle is later explained to be something else, but for three-fourths of the story you are led to believe that two men are in love with the same women who doesn’t know who to meld her soul with. I also didn’t find either relationship compatible, but that’s likely because I didn’t necessarily enjoy any of these characters enough to want to see them together.
The more I write this review, the more issues I seem to realize I had with the book. So I will just leave it at this. I did enjoy the Greek mythology portions, and I found the sibling relationship to be relatable, but other than that I’m too confused about so much that I can’t say else about the pros of the story. Hopefully if you decide to give this one a shot you’ll have a better time with it than I did.

My Rating: 3 of 5 stars.

book reviews · reviews

Flame in the Mist by Renée Ahdieh

“I’ve never been angry to have been born a woman. There have been times I’ve been angry at how the world treats us, but I see being a woman as a challenge I must fight. Like being born under a stormy sky. Some people are lucky enough to be born on a bright summer’s day. Maybe we were born under clouds. No wind. No rain. Just a mountain of clouds we must climb each morning so that we may see the sun.”

There hasn’t been a book in a long while that has enraptured me as strongly as Flame in the Mist by Renée Ahdieh. I’ve been in a bit of slump for some time now, only reading sections of a book and then losing all interest in it. When I first heard about this particular story, I knew I would at least enjoy it because it encompassed plenty of elements from my favorite movies and folklore. That I wound up loving it makes me incredibly happy because I can safely say that this book is my current favorite read of 2017! It was pitched as a mix between 47 Ronin and Mulan, so of course I was interested before the title and cover were even revealed. (However, unlike Mulan, this story takes place in feudal Japan and focuses on samurai and the seven tenets of Bushidō .)

This story is told through a third person narration, with perspectives shifting between our main character Mariko and occasionally her twin brother Kenshin. It begins as Hattori Mariko is carted within a norimono on her way to her betrothed— the emperor’s second son. Along the path she and her legion are forced to wander through the dark forest or risk being a day late for their arrival at the palace. But then they are attacked in the middle of the night, and Mariko scarcely escapes with her life after setting a farce display for her murderer’s to make certain they believe she is dead. Knowing that to wander the woods nearly naked and alone—and as a woman—Mariko harks on every ounce of self preservation to stay alive, but is sought out by a vagabond whom had been stalking her. In the end, she leaves the forest after chopping off lengths of her hair and donning the guise of a boy who’d run away from home.

She sets off to find her attackers with the hope of discovering their secrets and finding out why she was targeted in the first place. Yet things don’t go as planned, and soon she finds herself admits the ranks of the Black Clan, her supposed killers and a group of renegade warriors, and she must keep up her disguise if she wants to see the light of day while also gaining their trust and learning their ways. But as the story goes on, Mariko comes to the revelation that perhaps she was miscalculating everything from before she was even sent to the emperor’s home. And with this knowledge comes darker questions with answers she will have to face and suffer the consequences of.

The heroine has quite an aversion to men because she believes them to be only what she has seen— dominant in her society: conquerors, masters, and slavers. She has been so thoroughly shielded from the true world that her political union doesn’t phase her in the beginning of the book as much as it does at the end. Mariko is often being called “odd” and “curious” throughout the novel, both of which she initially describes as being frowned upon but comes to realize only makes her who she is. She begins to own those titles. Especially considering her knack for creativity, which is her passion for inventing things such as weapons and makeshift lanterns. Mariko is an inventor and a warrior, but her femininity is never washed away, even as she pretends to be a boy, because she is always mulling through an inner struggle with her identity in that she ponders the strength of being a woman. This invokes the very focal point of her character development— which is handled carefully and crafted with beautiful scenes. A particular section of this book that exemplifies this character arc is when Mariko and her group of warriors visit a Teahouse. It is during their visit where Mariko first sees a Geiko, and this is what transpires:

Geiko were referred to as living, floating works of art. The very idea had ruffled her sensibilities. That a beautiful woman could be nothing more than a form of entertainment, left to the vices and pleasures of men.

But as Mariko watched—transfixed—while a geiko clad in layers of tatsumura silk drifted across the spotless tatami mats, she realized her first mistake. This young woman did not stand or move from a place of subservience. Nor did she convey any sense that her existence was based solely on the whim of men. Not once did the geiko’s gaze register the newest arrivals. Her head was high, her gait proud. The poise with which she moved—the grace with which she took each of her steps—was a clear testament to years of training and tradition.

The young woman was not a plaything. Not at all.

And although Mariko is without a doubt my favorite character, the members of the Black Clan slowly stole my heart as well. They were equals parts Robin Hood and the Lost Boys, not at all what I had been expecting and definitely a good surprise. Without giving away too much, because to talk about these characters would mean I have to spoil something inevitably, I can tell you that Ōkami is the love of my life and I really hope to read more about his past in the second book (because yes, there WILL be a second novel)!

Which in turn brings me to another thing I adored— the romance. It’s not heavily packed into the tale, which I very much appreciated considering the pillars behind Flame in the Mist are based upon a woman discovering the strength of being herself and following her hearts desires. However, when it is mentioned… let’s just say I wasn’t prepared for how deeply I’d invest myself in the pairing that came about. It was the type of slow burning, enemies-to-lovers trope that I fall for every time, and yet it was unlike any of the others I have read. Partially due to the characters, and partially because of the pretty writing in this novel.

Ahdieh has such wonderful prose and whimsical imagery. You could sell me a story about two rocks sitting atop a bigger rock and I would give it a five-star rating if the setting and imagery deserved it. And with the setting being feudal Japan, it was something rare and breathtaking for me to journey through. I can’t speak for everyone when I say that I believe this story was well researched in terms of the historical accuracy, because I’m not Japanese and did find myself struggling with some terms, (there is a glossary in the back) but to someone who rarely encounters this type of setting, it felt thoroughly edited and authentic. Here’s a little piece of what to expect:

The outskirts of Inako now pressed beyond the fields and forests that had ringed its borders in the past. Snaking through the city’s center was a gentle flowing river littered with dying blossoms. Its petal pink waters were a painted stroke separating the tiled roofs on either shoreline—a swell of blue-grey clay, rising like the sea, bandied about by a storm.

There were many plot-twists and action scenes in this book, some of which I had suspected since the beginning but wound up second guessing the more I read. It was well thought-out and leaves plenty of room for a sequel… considering the ending wasn’t really an ending, more or less one path on a bridge overlooking the far side (aka Book II). I was dreading how much was left to be answered by the time I reached the final chapters, but upon realizing that there will be more books to come I felt much better and happier with the placement of where this tale left off. However, I can tell you there are many cliffhanger and Ahdieh really must love to keep her readers on their toes.

The only compliant I had, if any, was the magic system. We don’t really hear much of it until the commencing parts of the story, which probably means we will see a great deal of it in the second book. But there were a few things I still don’t understand, even though I’ve reread them twice to check if I missed something. I’ll probably reread the whole book another hundred times before 2018.

I hope you all enjoy this one as much as I did! Book two is too long away. I’m not sure how I can cope for another year!

My Rating: 5/5 stars

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Feyre Archeron: Cosplay

Ever since the title for A Court of Wings and Ruin released I’ve been itching to cosplay at least one character from the ACOTAR series by Sarah J Maas. It only took two people to say that I looked like Feyre for me to fully accept that “challenge” (haha, but really, as a first time cosplay-er this was a lot more fun that I had expected it to be). Finding all of the gear and accessories was the fun part… walking through a public hiking trail and an arboretum wearing elf ears and a ball gown was a bit awkward to say the least.

So without any further delay, here are all of the photos we shot over the week! I definitely plan on cosplaying my favorite character this coming fall– LUCIEN. I’m already teaching myself how to properly use prosthetic makeup and apply colored eye contacts. And with a possible Lucien novella lurking just around the corner, I really can’t wait!

Ears: Geekling Creations on Etsy
Headpiece: NebulaXCrafts on Etsy
Dress: DHGate
Bow & Arrow: Bounty Bunker on Etsy
Book: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, BookDepo
Arm Jewelry: Heartichoke (Huntington, NY)

 

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A Court of Wings and Ruin | Review (SPOILERS.)

“You do not fear. You do not falter. You do not yield.
Remember that you are a wolf. And you cannot be caged.”

Rating: 3.5 stars.

After swearing that I would drag this book out as long as I possibly could, I have finished it within the course of three days. So much for patience. But at the very least, in my defense I have to say, I couldn’t find it in me to put it down. As the last “official” book in the series (but not the final installment, for we will probably see novellas in the future) it was almost everything I had hoped for. I say almost because although it is also the lengthiest of the trilogy, there are cliffhangers and questions left unattended at the end. However, I have a feeling that will be where the novellas come into play. Without spoiling anything, I’d wager we definitely will be getting a Lucien novel! You can imagine how hard I cried over that revelation.

In A Court of Wings and Ruin, we follow as our heroine, Feyre, infiltrates her enemy court to gather information on the upcoming war. The High Lord of Spring doesn’t suspect anything amiss, blaming her absence on mind control and believing her to have been a prisoner, yet his emissary— (also, let’s be honest, the best character in the whole series…nope, I’m not biased at all)— Lucien begins to notice things not quite settling with her return. Those initial chapters of Feyre’s time in Spring were both painful and exhilarating to read because you are compelled to sympathize with her by also cheering her on through her devious work and spying. It isn’t until certain scenarios break apart the foundation of the court where Feyre, along with her wary friend Lucien, find themselves north of Prythian in the Night Court. From there, the story becomes full of battle strategies, ancient creatures, reunion scenes, and of course—confrontations and revelations. (No joke, the final war scene took about one-hundred pages. And it was intense throughout the whole ordeal.)

I finished reading A Court of Wings and Ruin a few days ago and at first I thought I loved it. But after the dreaded honeymoon phase… I’ve started to realize that I really didn’t enjoy this book as much as I had thought I would. As much as I had hoped I would.
For some reason it just didn’t feel like a Sarah J Maas book, especially not one from the A Court of Thorns and Roses series. I know Throne of Glass has its ups and downs, but with ACOTAR I was expecting a phenomenal finale due to how incredible A Court of Mist and Fury was. I’m still sickened and shocked by how much this book failed me. I’ve invested my heart into theses characters—not a day went by for almost two years where I didn’t think of the series at least once— and to read the last book, thinking it was going to be the mother of all fantasy novels, and to realize that I didn’t connect with any of the characters I was in love with…. it hurt. A lot.

I have seen many people speculate that she might have not written to the best of her ability due to the pressure put on Maas to finish the series on time, but with the amount of books she has written and the length of them all, I would have at least expected a bit more than what we got. We all joked that we didn’t know how she could end a series, thinking it might result in the deaths of our favorite character, but I didn’t think their death would literally come at the hand of the author for not writing them the way they’ve always been portrayed, even by the fans.

For starters, there’s Mor. I’m not so much bothered by the way in which her sexuality came out than I am by her treatment for… well, for the entire book. Mor is supposed to be this strong and compassionate woman who doesn’t let shit bother her and uplifts others! In ACOWAR, Mor not only is repeatedly overshadowed by other events and characters, but she acts aggesvijy in a way that doesn’t line up right with her original aesthetic. She is terse with Amren, almost platonic with Feyre, and outright brazen towards Nesta. In fact, the only people she seems to care about in the book are Azriel and Cassian, even though she’s partially using them as a cover because she’s afraid to come out about being bisexual. I’m sure that wasn’t intended on the authors part, to make it seem like Mor suddenly didn’t have that compassionate side to her anymore, but tragically that’s what this story conveyed to me. And to be fair? She had all the right to not be kind to them, especially after Rhysand and Azriel put her in the position where she had to negotiate with her rapists and abusers in order to further their alliance in the war. I couldn’t believe what I was reading when I saw that. I know Rhys can screw up at times, as is known from his character in the prior two books, but this was just outright OOC and made me feel really uncomfortable for the rest of the novel. Not to mention that Keir doesn’t even face a bad end? In fact, I don’t think it’s even mentioned what happens to him other than the promise Rhysand made to allow all the vile people from the Hewn City into Velars (I cried so much reading that. I was actually praying Feyre would use her High Lady card to ensure that didn’t happen).

The only character who I thought to be perfectly in character was Cassian, but even his parts felt clipped or forced. I think that’s in part due to the book being seven-hundred pages long wherein all the loose ends had to get tied up before the final chapter, but also it was in part due to the writing. It just felt rushed, as though the focal point of the book shift from being about character development and relationships to being about plot and battle tactics. Even the setting felt like a grey area— definitely not like the atmosphere from the Spring Court or Velaris. I wasn’t even sure where we were in certain parts of the book because the usual lengthy descriptors that I adored weren’t written into the book at all save for all the battlefield scenes.

Feyre and Rhysand’s relationship felt (while not necessarily dull) incomplete? I was rooting for them since book one, and after book two I had really thought that this was going to be the finale to make all other YA finale books want to be like it. I had high expectations and they were practically all trampled on. Every Feysand scene was either a smutty sex scene or just the two of them being in the same room discussing politics. There wasn’t any cuteness or snark from the prior books, and it almost felt like Rhysand lost his sarcastic/ fun nature that made us all fall for him and Feyre lost her tactical nature that made her such a good huntress. Kind of backwards for what we had anticipated from these two, isn’t it? It felt like they were present, but not actually there. I cried during Rhysand’s death scene, but in the back of my mind I knew what was coming. Why? Because we already saw it happen in the first book. While I think it was intended to be some sort of homage to the original story, it fell flat for me and I truly believe it was only added for shock value. As were much of the scenarios in this story.

Lucien…. I wrote a 2k+ meta about his arc in ACOWAR on tumblr, and you can read all about what I felt regarding it right HERE. But to surmise: I love that he escaped Spring and is now going to pursue a life in Velaris, but I hate that it seems as though he still wants forgiveness from Tamlin when it should be the other way around. I know we’re most likely going to get a novella for him, which would explain why the Helion/ High Lady of Autumn drama went unanswered in this book, but I don’t think it’s smart to bank off of a novella to answer questions that should be laid at peace in the official series.

I was thrilled with the arc given to Lucien, however I don’t think he had the proper character development that I had been hoping for. For starters, he finally realizes that Tamlin is a toxic friend and that he needs to separate himself from Spring, so Lucien goes with Feyre to the Night Court where he is then treated as you might imagine— the Inner Circle is wary of him, but they give him the chance to prove he is not like the Court he had just escaped from. Feyre helps them understand him a bit more, and we even get a scene where Lucien is wearing Illyrian leathers and wielding blades gifted to him by Cassian and Azriel! I loved that he was so prominent in the first half of the book, but towards the end he nearly vanished. And then we only saw pieces of him in the aftermath of the war. Unsurprisingly, I was bitter about that. Way to dangle a treat in front of a dog, Maas. However, Lucien does say to Feyre in the end “I have quite the story to tell you.” about his time missing in the book, and we are also told that his father isn’t Beron, but Helion—High Lord of Day. It all makes sense to me now that we have this information, and I was put out that we never got to see the two of them talk. I don’t even know if either of them are aware of what they mean to one another! Hence: a Lucien novella. It’s bound to happen.

It didn’t feel like I was reading a finale, especially not one to my favorite series. This is definitely my least favorite of the trilogy, and I’m so hurt (betrayed?) by the concept of that. I wish this book hadn’t come out and that we were all still in the excited month-before-publication phase where we thought we were going to get a million times more of the content than we actually did.

There were parts I really loved, like Azriel teaching Feyre to fly, Feyre and the Suriel having a heart to heart, the Archeron sisters sleeping in the same bed together like they once did when they were mortal etc… but the parts I didn’t like weigh too heavily on my heart to be overlooked.

Maas really stepped up the diversity in this book, and I couldn’t be happier about that. She’s finally learning! We find out that most of the courts are created of people of color, even the Winter Court (which a lot of fans had casted to be all white). I’m not just talking about the cop-out “tanned skin” or “warm tone” semantics often used in prior books. On the matter of LGBTQ+ representation, we see plenty of non-hetero romances, even within the main character group. I know for a fact that these characters could have been handled better: Helion being bisexual and written as a person who loves to sleep around? That’s just a classic stereotype and I wish it had been left out. Mor…. while I might be in the smaller portion of the fandom who was happy with her coming out, and found her story to be understandable and even relatable, I just wish it didn’t have to happen in the last chapter of the last book. Obviously it was a second thought type of decision, but it I’m glad she is canon bisexual. I just wish it wasn’t kept a secret at the end of the book.

I’m such a fan of Maas. What happened to this book destroyed me. I just can’t wrap my head around how she and the publishers let this happen?

Overall I just can’t believe this series is “over.” I know there will be novellas to come, but it’s the feeling you get when you finish a book that leaves you stunned for weeks on end… that’s going to be tough to deal with. I already miss these characters. It actually makes me sick thinking about how much I miss them because I feel like the last I saw them was actually in A Court of Mist and Fury. But all I can say now is: can’t wait for the fanfiction. I already have a million and one ideas! Hopefully these novellas come out soon.