An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

rate 5

This book is a spring banquet of ripe grapefruit wine, a summer morning beneath swaying willow trees, an autumnal bonfire deep in the woods, and a wintry dusk backset to the wind.

….At least it made me feel that way. Rogerson killed the imagery game.

I’ve been waiting for a very long time for a book like this to come out. I’ve always been obsessed with faeries and elvish folklore, and while I’ve read just about every book related to those mythologies nothing ever seemed quite right. Sure, all of the characters had pointy ears, magical powers, and lived somewhat near the forest, but that’s about where the similarities cut off. I wanted a story where the Fae were humanoid with tree roots for limbs and flowers for lips, where they worshipped nature instead of just lived in it— something closer to the rendition of Celtic folklore including the Wild Hunt, changelings, and caverns beneath the earth. And I’m so happy to say that An Enchantment of Ravens was that book for me.

Our narrator is a young portrait artist named Isobel who lives in a village called Whimsy where it is eternally summer. Her Craft— a form of human creativity that cannot be done by Fair Folk without risk of harm—is legendary for someone her age, and various Fair Ones come to visit her parlor to be painted, if only for a small price. All masters of Craft receive enchantments as a form of payment, but if worded wrong these wishes can go awry. Isobel always wishes for practical things and words them right, much to the delight of her regular client and wish-granter Gadfly. But upon one of his usual visits, Gadfly tells Isobel that she should expect the Autumn Prince soon. And while she gets to know Rook more intimately than any of her other clients, she accidentally paints mortal sorrow into his eyes. For this, the price is grave, and now Rook must take Isobel to his home, the Autumnlands, to stand trial for what she has done. However, they might never make it there with what lurks between her world and his kingdom.

The writing, the plot, the characters, the romance….everything in this book is a treat. At first I thought that it might be a bit fast-paced because it’s just a tad smaller in length to some of my more recent reads, but that’s definitely not the case. It was well thought out from the start to the finish with no “filler” scenes or rushed pivotal moments. I took my time reading this book and it really helped me delve into the setting so much so that I felt a deep connection with the main characters by the commencement of the final page.

As I’ve mentioned before, one of the deal-breaking moments for me was the rendition of the Fae. The Fair Folk in this book cannot lie, are harmed by iron, have humanoid skins they wear as a disguise to hide their more monstrous forms underneath, live in places made of all things natural, and (my favorite) don’t have emotions. Supposedly.

One thing that always stood out to me amongst these other faerie novels was that the authors were quick to include emotion of some sort amongst their kind, wherein the original tales depicted the Fae as cruel, often vindictive and evil characters that didn’t feel human emotion and rather loved to toil with it for their own reprieve. That being said, the only romance featured in this book is saved for the main characters—which I thought was a wonderful decision as opposed to the usual minor “ships” that are often sidelined and then forced to fulfill plot devices. Also, it made the story seem more like a fairytale which was entirely the vibe I got from it (a morbid, eerily beautiful fairytale at that).

“He was no more able to understand the sorrow of a human’s death than a fox might mourn the killing of a mouse.”

Not to be dramatic, but I think I’ve found my favorite YA male protagonist as well. I had gone into this book believing that the Autumn Prince would be brooding with a side of dark humor (you know the type, I’m sure) but you can imagine my utter surprise when I find that Rook is, in fact, quite the opposite. He is good-natured, apologizes whenever he thinks he’s upset someone even when he hasn’t, doesn’t understand human emotion and finds it terrifying, and has a deep love for autumn. There were many hysterical moments between Rook and Isobel but I won’t mention them here because they’re something you should experience on your own. However, I will say that when someone bows or curtsies to a Fair One, that Fae must return the gesture immediately.

His character development is prominent throughout the story, as is Isobel’s, but I won’t mention more for fear of spoiling you. Rest assured, there were many things I picked up on that had changed from the beginning to the end, and they changed for the better. I also adore the way in which his physical descriptor was written: “…against his golden-brown complexion, which put me in mind of late-afternoon sunlight dappling fallen leaves.” And I think it’s important to note that he has ADHD, something my brother suffers from, and I found it refreshing to see this trait with a main character for a change. Did I mention that he can also transform into a dark horse and a raven?

I’ve already re-read this story three times and each time brings about stronger emotions for me. This is one of those books that you’ll want to revisit frequently because it plays with your heart in ways no other stories have (at least that’s the case for me)! The ending was wild, and while everything was answered and little to no ties were left untangled, I still want more. As of now I believe this is a stand-alone, but if there were ever a sequel in it’s future there would be plenty of things to write further more from where this book ended. If not that, then you can expect I’ll be dabbling in my fair share of Fanfiction. Enough said: READ THIS BOOK.

My Rating: 5/5
Goodreads Link: X

And because I’m so enraptured with this tale, I did a little makeup look inspired by the Autumnlands! It’s nothing overly magnificent because I just recently discovered my love for makeup, but it’s certainly something else. Who knows, I’d still wear this to class.

Eyeshadow: Modern Renaissance by Anastasia Beverly Hills
Liquid Eyeliner: Kat Von D
Elf Ears: Geekling Creations on Etsy

Processed with VSCO with c7 preset

Processed with VSCO with c7 preset

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10 thoughts on “An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

    1. Thank you! Charlie Bowater is the artist for the cover of the book and ever since I heard she was working on a story that’s about faeries I knew I’d love it. And I’m so excited I do! I hope you’ll love it too 🙂

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  1. I am so excited for this book! I heard so many great things, and your review makes me even more excited. I loved your Faerie Book Recommendation Post. I added many of those books to my TBR.

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  2. I loved reading your review. ‘The Autumn Prince’? 🍂Seriously? That sounds like a title someone should have to convince you since you really like Autumn. 😉

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