Jeannette Walls: The Glass Castle Q+A

glass castle beachJust this previous week I was lucky enough to see a screening of the book adaption The Glass Castle thanks to Lionsgate. The book is written by Jeannette Walls and the movie was directed by Destin Daniel Cretton. The story follows four siblings as they are raised on the run, constantly moving from home and adapting to their new environments. Their parents are wild, carefree, and reckless, but they’ve also taught their children a way to experience the world that no other kids in their predicament ever could understand. That nostalgia is what ignites a moment of reflection for Jeannette as she is on her way to a fancy event in New York City and looks out her taxicab to see her mother picking through a dumpster. The Walls parents are found squatting in an abandoned building on the Lower East Side, having traveled half way across the country to the city so they can be near their children who’ve only ever wanted to distance themselves from their dangerous childhood.

The movie was a brilliant adaption of the book, staying true to every plot and characteristic while also keeping the more morbid and troublesome to read scenes slightly less dark. If anything, the movie was a tad lighter and more peaceful than the chaotic wilderness of the book, but both the novel and the film ended on a similar note with the same intended message.

Brie Larson was phenomenal and played the part of Jeannette as though she had taken in a part of her soul. You could really see it in the actor’s eyes how deeply connected she became with her character, especially because the book is a biography and the author was revealed to often be on the set of the shoot. It was magical to watch unfurl, and there were numerous times where I had to hold back tears.

During a Q&A interview with the Jeannette Walls, Naomi Watts, and Brie Larson, the women of the Glass Castle movie spoke about their time on set, getting to adapt to their characters, and learning from the story the importance of empowering yourself. The whole atmosphere of the event was saturated in deep conversations about inner strength. Walls is a remarkable speaker as well! Occasionally I’ve notice some authors who aren’t the strongest public speakers, but Jeannette could be on TED with how well she communicated with us all.

A member of the press asked “The tension between self-preservation and care for others is a theme throughout the entire film, and I would love to hear your experiences dealing with this both as an individual and when in the film.” Jeannette then tells us all that this is something she has wrestled with for most of her life because she is a survivor. She then explains that while many people have asked her how she could forgive her parents for all that they have caused her, she believes the only person she needed to forgive was herself.

Jeannette explained that “we who pull ourselves up by the bootstraps and have to make some tough choices to get by are a bit selfish. And that was one of the transformative things about watching this movie— seeing Brie Larson making these tough choices. I loved her and was rooting for her in a way that I never loved or rooted for myself. It was kind of magnificent.”

The Glass Castle is now in theaters everywhere and you can watch the trailer by clicking right here. I highly recommend bringing your tissues! It’ll be an emotional ride.

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